Field metabolic rates of teleost fishes are recorded in otolith carbonate

Our new method of otolith metabolic proxy is released today in the journal “Communications Biology” from Nature. We are excited to demonstrate how we use stable carbon isotope values recorded in otoliths to reconstruct fish field metabolic rate. Our study provides the first high-resolution metabolic rate estimates for fish in the field. Moreover, our approach now allows researchers to make use of the large archives of otoliths systematically collected for more than 100 years in order to investigate historical and contemporary changes to fish physiology.

Please see details: https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-018-0266-5

 

 

 

 

Feeding ecology of capelin (Mallotus villosus) in a fjord impacted by glacial meltwater (Godthåbsfjord, Greenland)

Capelin (Mallotus villosus) feeding is strongly influenced by the zooplankton community in the fjord ecosystem. Our study examined the stomach content of capelin to conclude the importance of larger zooplankton and euphausiids in capelin’s ecology and the influence of Arctic and sub-Arctic fjord ecosystems. More details: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00300-018-2400-8

Continue reading “Feeding ecology of capelin (Mallotus villosus) in a fjord impacted by glacial meltwater (Godthåbsfjord, Greenland)”

Population decline in the endemic Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) in Kapisillit River, Greenland

The Kapisillit River is the only salmon (Salmo salar) river in Greenland, in which the population size of Atlantic salmon is currently much lower than in the late 1950s and in aa loss of genetic diversity. Our study emphasise the importance of management and monitoring  in fishing mortality. More details: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/fme.12306

Continue reading “Population decline in the endemic Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) in Kapisillit River, Greenland”

Genomic parallelism and lack thereof in contrasting systems of three-spine sticklebacks

Three‐spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in populations in Denmark and Greenland have been applying to test the evolutionary hypothesis of genomic parallelism.  This study provides empirical evidence and support. More details: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/mec.14782

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Our student, Sebastian, shares his internship experience at NAFO

On the 23rdof April, I started my internship at NAFO. I am now halfway through it, and I don’t look forward to the ending of it. I have enjoyed it immensely, with both different projects and with wonderful people to welcome me. But a little background information on NAFO.

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New publication from Amy: Influence of riverine input on the growth of Glycymeris glycymeris in the Bay of Brest, North-West France

An annually-resolved cross-dated chronology was built over 114 years using 38 Glycymeris glycymeris shells, both live and dead collected from the Bay of Brest, France. Standard sclerochronology techniques along with COFECHA and ARSTAN provided a statistically robust expressed population signal (EPS) which correlated with various environmental factors such as inflow from the River Elorn, food availability, salinity and annual rainfall. All this could be traced back to food availability pushed into the Bay of Brest, using a PCA.

Click here to get the article.